So You Adopted a New Pet…Now What?

Adopted a New PetSharing your life with an animal is such a worthwhile experience, but bringing home a new pet is not without its challenges. First and foremost, pet owners must be able to responsibly provide for their new addition in every possible way. But don’t worry – preparing for and meeting the needs of your new pet can be fun!

Before You Roll Out the Welcome Mat

It’s common for animal lovers to convince themselves that love is all they need to care for a new pet. This is undoubtedly important, but without a commonsense approach to living quarters, sustainability, and commitment, even the most loved pet is still at risk of being surrendered. Before making any final decisions, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Are you allowed to have a pet where you live? If so, is a pet deposit required? Do your living quarters realistically support the needs of a potential pet (backyard space, living with other pets, access to exercise, etc.)?
  • Do you live with others who may have allergies or aversions to certain species or breeds?
  • Do you make enough money to meet the health care needs of a pet?
  • Are you willing to dedicate several hours each week to training and exercising your new pet?
  • Have you considered the needs of other animals you already own?

The Right Match

Choosing the right pet for you is a huge part of the adoption equation. It’s a decision that will impact others for many years and must be one that lasts forever. We’re happy to help you make this life-changing decision.

Bringing Your New Pet Home

Once all the major factors have been considered, there’s a lot that must happen at home and around your property to ensure your new pet’s safety, comfort, and happiness.

  • Pet proof your space. Take a close look at what your new pet may encounter. Cords, electrical wires, and other entrapment risks should be removed. Cleaning chemicals, certain plants, medications, and personal products must also be stored properly. Be sure to stash all food off tables and counters.
  • Talk with others in your home. If you live with other people, spend time with your roommates or family members (especially kids) discussing how to care for your new pet.
  • Get the right gear. Your new pet will require food, bowls, bedding, toys, and ID tags to wear on a new collar and leash. It’s also important to consider bathroom and crate needs.

The First Vet Visit

Some pets are spayed or neutered before adoption and receive some vaccines and parasite preventives. That being said, it’s vital to get a head start on your new pet’s wellness as early as a few days after bringing them home. During your visit, we can discuss any potential problems, the need for training, and address the importance of microchipping.

It can take a few weeks to a few months for everyone in your home to become accustomed to your new pet. If we can help move the transition along, please contact us.

Congratulations on your new pet!